The Willistonian, Est. 1881

Korean Peace Talks on the Horizon

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Photo Credit: Public Domain.

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Photo Credit: Public Domain.

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The long standing war between North and South Korea may be coming to an end.

On Wednesday, April 18, South Korea confirmed that it has been in talks with American and North Korean delegates over bringing peace to the Korean Peninsula, according to The New York Times.

Last month, In March, South Korean officials stated that North Korea was willing to give up its nuclear arms if the country received security guarantees from both the US and South Korea. According to the New York Times, these security guarantees include moving all US troops out of South Korea. This was something the U.S. was not willing to do then, so either the deal has been altered or the U.S. has changed its mind.

North and South Korea have technically been in an armistice since 1953, when a ceasefire was negotiated to “end” the Korean War. Tensions have been high ever since, with China-backed North Korea threatening the U.S.-backed South Korea with nuclear weapons.

China itself has brought up the prospect of peace several times over the past few decades, according to The Guardian, but never gained any traction in its pursuit. Now, with talks ramping up, many feel as though the ongoing trade war and rising tempers between China and the Trump administration may slow down or even stop talks.

“There’s so much more to this than people realize,” Junior Insoo Kang, “peace isn’t simple. Especially not in this case.”

According to the New York Times, one of China’s demands is going to be the U.S. officially recognizing North Korea as a sovereign state, something the U.S. has been denying since the outbreak of war almost 60 years ago.

The stalemate in the peace talks is eerily similar to the stalemate the two countries and their supporters have been partaking in since the 1950s.

As far as the US and South Korean demands, the New York Times speculates that it could be a demilitarization of the “DMZ,” the 2.5-mile-wide zone which divides North and South Korea. The DMZ is currently the most heavily-armed area in the world. U.S. and South Korea demands also include a a cancelation of the North Korean missile program.

“These countries need to stop bickering and just get something done,” Senior John Kim, from Seoul, South Korea, said. “I want my family to stop having to worry.”

These demands are the same as they’ve always been, except this time it seems as though Kim Jung-un is recognizing that his missiles don’t get off the ground unless the Soviets build them, and that his people are starving and dying at alarming rate.

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